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Transurethral resection of the prostate - discharge

Transurethral resection of the prostate - discharge

TURP - discharge; Prostate resection - transurethral - discharge


You had transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) surgery to treat an enlarged prostate. This article tells you how to take care of yourself at home after the procedure.

When You're in the Hospital


You had transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) surgery to treat an enlarged prostate.

Your surgeon inserted a tube-like tool called a cystoscope (or endoscope) through your urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the penis). Your surgeon used a special cutting tool to remove part of your prostate gland piece by piece.


What to Expect at Home


You can expect to start doing most of your normal activities in 3 to 6 weeks. Problems you may notice include:

  • Problems with urine control or leakage after sneezing, coughing, or lifting
  • Erection problems (impotence)
  • Passing the semen back up into the bladder instead of out through the urethra (retrograde ejaculation)
  • Burning or pain during urination
  • Passing blood clots




You should rest as often as you need to the first few weeks after surgery. But you should also do regular, short periods of movement to build up your strength. While resting, continue to do some of the bedside exercises and breathing techniques your nurse showed you.

Gradually return to your normal routine. You should not do any strenuous activity, lifting (more than 5 pounds or more than 2 kilograms), or driving for 3 to 6 weeks.

Try taking regular, short walks. Work up to longer walks to build up your strength. You can return to work when you are better and can tolerate most activities.

Drink plenty of water to help flush fluids through the bladder (8 to 10 glasses a day). Avoid coffee, soft drinks, and alcohol. They can irritate your bladder and urethra.

Eat a healthy diet with plenty of fiber. You may use a stool softener or fiber supplement to help prevent constipation, which can delay the healing process.

For the first few weeks after surgery, take only the medicines your health care provider has told you to take.

  • You may need to take antibiotics to help prevent infection.
  • Check with your doctor before taking aspirin, ibuprofen (Aleve, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), acetaminophen (Tylenol), or any other drugs like these.

You may take showers. If you have a catheter, DO NOT take baths until it is removed.

Avoid sexual activity for 3 to 4 weeks. Many men report a lower amount of semen during orgasm after having TURP.


Urinary Catheters


You may feel spasms in your bladder and may feel like you need to urinate while you have a urinary catheter in place. Your provider can give you medicine for these spasms. You may have urine come out around the catheter because of the bladder spams. This is normal.

You will need to make sure your indwelling catheter works right. You will also need to know how to clean the tube and the area where it attaches to your body. This will prevent infection and skin irritation. There should be urine draining and filling the bag if the catheter is working properly. Call your provider if you have not seen any urine drain in an hour.

The urine in your drainage bag may look darker red. This is normal.

After your catheter is removed:

  • You may have some urine leakage (incontinence). This should get better over time. You should have close-to-normal bladder control within 3 to 6 months.
  • You will learn exercises (Kegel exercises) that strengthen the muscles in your pelvis. You can do these exercises any time you are sitting or lying down.


When to Call the Doctor


Call your provider if:

  • You have pain in your belly that is not helped with your pain medicines
  • It is hard to breathe
  • You have a cough that does not go away
  • You cannot drink or eat
  • Your temperature is above 100.5°F (38°C)
  • Your urine has a thick, yellow, green, or milky drainage
  • You have signs of infection (burning sensation when you urinate, fever, or chills)
  • Your urine stream is not as strong, or you cannot pass any urine at all
  • You have pain, redness, or swelling in your legs

While you have a urinary catheter, call your provider if:

  • You have pain near the catheter
  • You are leaking urine
  • You notice more blood in your urine
  • Your catheter seems blocked and is not draining urine
  • You notice grit or stones in your urine
  • Your urine smells bad, or it is cloudy or a different color




Abrams P, Chapple C, Khoury S, Roehrborn C, de la Rosette J; International Consultation on New Developments in Prostate Cancer and Prostate Diseases. Evaluation and treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms in older men. J Urol. 2013;189(1 Suppl):S93-S101. PMID: 23234640

Roehrborn CG. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: etiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and natural history. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Partin AW, Peters CA, eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 103.

Sarma AV, Wei JT. Clinical practice. Benign prostatic hyperplasia and lower urinary tract symptoms. N Engl J Med. 2012;367(3):248-257. PMID: 22808960

Welliver C, McVary KT. Minimally invasive and endoscopic management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Partin AW, Peters CA, eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 105.

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                Review Date: 5/1/2017

                Reviewed By: Jennifer Sobol, DO, urologist with the Michigan Institute of Urology, West Bloomfield, MI. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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